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2018 San Diego Housing Federation Ruby Awards Winners

2018 San Diego Housing Federation Ruby Awards Winners

Algire Talmadge

The San Diego Housing Federation held its 2018 Ruby Awards in Balboa Park Thursday, recognizing leadership, innovation, and impact in the affordable housing and
community development industries.  I was happy to see the Talmadge Gateway project among the winners, which overcame the usual Kensington/Talmadge NIMBY objections over parking, traffic and in this case, outright exclusionism.   Here’s a rundown of all the winners (thanks to SDHF and Cook & Schmid for photos and information):

Outstanding Resident Leader Award – Miguel Figueroa

Miguel Figueroa is a resident of Paradise Creek Apartments at 2120 Hoover Avenue in National City, where he began volunteering in the Paradise Creek Learning Center’s afterschool program in his teens. He has worked his way up as Volunteer Leader at the Learning Center, becoming the first teen to ascend to this position. He participates every single day to work with Kindergarteners to 5th-grade students to support them on homework and in enhancing their literacy skills. He has been a huge positive role model at the Learning Center, encouraging other young males to also become involved, and also ensuring his younger sister attends regularly as well. He is a bright, inspirational leader that is truly deserving of the Outstanding Resident Leader award.

Outstanding Service to Residents – Dennis Dearie

Dennis Dearie is the Director of Supportive Services for Serving Seniors, a nonprofit that provides services to older adults living in poverty. Dennis has played a large role in the success of Serving Seniors’ two supportive housing buildings, Potiker Family Senior Residence at 525 14th Street and Potiker City Heights Residence at 4065 43rd Street. The two buildings encompass 350 units of affordable housing for senior citizens. As Director of Supportive Services, Dennis earned the Outstanding Service to Residents award for his unwavering support, compassion and encouragement to senior residents in need. In his position, he works closely with communities that are at the cross-section of the most vulnerable seniors. He has a deep interest in the well-being of his residents and incorporates social events including education and health workshops as well as the necessary resources for successful, independent living.

Outstanding Advocate – Jackie Camp

Jackie Camp was selected for her 20-year commitment to affordable housing and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Serving as the longest member of the City of Oceanside Housing Commission, her expertise towards affordable housing and the ADA has been critical given the number of seniors and individuals with disabilities who often depend on affordable housing due to their incomes. Jackie regularly requires updated presentations and timelines from city staff and developers to ensure that affordable housing is met with the highest build quality, design and is ADA-compliant.  She asks tough questions and is not afraid to express her opinions of projects that do not meet a high standard.

Outstanding Development Partner – LISC San Diego

LISC San Diego works tirelessly to support the affordable housing development community, providing catalytic funding for the creation of affordable housing.  The agency’s strategic move to raise a $50-million Housing Affordability Fund that could accelerate the creation of 2,500 affordable housing units in San Diego is a true testament to their dedication and commitment to affordable housing for the City.  Executive Director Ricardo Flores explains, “We’re aiming to take a leadership role in jump-starting these projects, which are sorely needed as government and private interests work together to ease our region’s growing housing crisis. We’re committed to our role as a prime facilitator in the months and years ahead.”  LISC San Diego knows how to make things happen and their unflinching championship of the affordable housing sector distinguishes them as the recipient of the Outstanding Development Partner of the Year.

Outstanding Government Agency or Elected Official – Senator Toni Atkins and Assemblymember Brian Maienschein

Senator Toni Atkins is a long-time advocate in the fight to improve California’s affordable housing dilemma.  Her introduction of Senate Bill 2 (the building Homes and Jobs Act) during the 2017 legislative session has created a permanent funding source to benefit affordable housing and decreased regulations for affordable housing developers.  The Act is estimated to generate $250 million annually ($1.2 billion during the next five years), create 20,000 new houses and produce 57,000 jobs over five years. Champions like Senator Atkins’ efforts are pivotal in addressing the housing crisis; they will improve the quality of life for California’s future.

Assemblymember Brian Maienschein is a former San Diego City Councilmember, United Way Commissioner on the Homelessness, and currently representing the 77th State Assembly district. He was supportive of Senate Bill 2, and was one of the deciding votes for its passage.

John Craven Memorial Award – Rachel Hurst

Kensington resident Rachel Hurst is awarded the John Craven Memorial Award for her commitment as a public employee who has taken risks and has gone above and beyond the call of duty to assist affordable housing developers. In her role as City of Coronado’s Director of Redevelopment and Housing Services, she led her team to rehabilitate and develop the City’s and Coronado Unified School District’s facilities and improvements such as the Village Theatre. The Theater was closed for many years, and Rachel worked with an absentee landlord and movie theater operator to completely renovate and reopen the theater. Rachel served Coronado for more than 11 years, training and managing a team to support the community’s planning and building needs. There, she oversaw the development of the Coronado Senior Housing on Orange Avenue, and helped to acquire and rehabilitate other properties.  She has also served as the Housing and Redevelopment Director for the City of La Mesa, where she helped to develop one of the first large-scale transit-oriented developments in San Diego, and was previously a planner for the cities of Simi Valley, San Diego, and Beverly Hills.

SDG&E Environmental Award and Innovations Award – North Park Seniors

Innovative and imaginative, North Park Seniors is a groundbreaking project, consisting of 194 units (including 76 affordable apartments). It was designed and entitled as a sustainable, transit-oriented, mixed-income development. The developer Community HousingWorks partnered with the LGBT Center of San Diego to provide homes that are open to all, with an affirming and supportive environment for LGBT seniors. It is one of only a handful of such developments in the nation. It also shelters formerly homeless seniors in eight permanent supportive housing units. The artist and architect, both North Park local businesses, collaborated on creating the “You Are Home” installation, which embraces the pedestrian landscape with color, movement, and a sundial and tower with motifs of the timeless cycle of sun and stars.

CSH Supportive Housing Award – Talmadge Gateway

Talmadge Gateway is a project that has transformed San Diego’s approach to addressing homelessness for older adults, paving the way for a replicable model that can make a significant difference in elder homelessness across the country. Talmadge Gateway embodies all of the elements of quality supportive housing. St. Paul’s PACE and Wakeland have provided a much needed solution for the 59 residents who moved in, as well as a national best practice that is challenging other communities in San Diego and across the country to identify how they can also effectively weave together PACE services, affordable housing, operating subsidies, and have referrals flow to the property through the Coordinated Entry System (a program which streamlines the process of finding housing for those who are chronically homeless — with the goal of housing the most vulnerable people first).

Project of the Year – Rehab – Woodglen

Woodglen Vista Apartments provides high-quality affordable housing to 185 families who earn at or below 50% and 60% of the area median income (AMI) in a community with excellent job and educational opportunities.  Last year’s property rehabilitation went above and beyond the typical property refresh. The 2017 rehab of this 40-year old property was focused on both improvements in the individual units and an overhaul of the major components of the property infrastructure.  This involved a retrofit of the landscape irrigation system and the introduction of a solar hot water heating system. Common areas were redesigned in order to step up resident services. Woodglen Vista became part of the SanteeTLC (Teaching- Learning-Connecting), a collective impact network focused on utilizing trauma-informed practices to engage students, families, school staff, and the community. Santee TLC is comprised of a group of 25 cross-sector partners, anchored by the Santee School District.

Project of the Year – New Construction – Atmosphere

Atmosphere is a new, 12-story high-rise community of 205 affordable homes in downtown San Diego that uniquely serves the broad spectrum of people who need affordable housing, including working families, seniors and people who have been homeless. The $79 million project does this by integrating traditional affordable housing with 51 units of permanent supportive housing designed to help the formerly homeless live stable, independent lives.

Designed by an internationally-recognized architecture firm and slated to achieve LEED Silver Certification for sustainability, the development brings numerous benefits to the neighborhood, including:

  • The revitalization of an underutilized inner city site that has remained vacant since 2004 with a vibrant, attractive and affordable community that has the potential to help up to 10,000 people over its 55-year life span;
  • A significant increase in the amount of high-quality affordable homes available to San Diegans that are located close to jobs, transportation and other resources residents need for daily living;
  • And the addition of 51 much-needed supportive homes with wraparound services that promote individual well-being and independence for people who have been homeless.

 

Housing Champion Award – Ken Sauder

The Housing Champion Award honors professionals with more than two decades of leadership, innovation and impact in the affordable housing field. Ken Sauder was selected for his 35-year commitment to affordable housing that continues to advance the principles of the San Diego Housing Federation. As President and CEO of Wakeland Housing, he led the development of more than 6,700 units in 44 developments throughout California, including more than 100 units of permanent supportive housing designed to help stabilize formerly homeless individuals. Throughout his career, Sauder has exemplified strong leadership and an unwavering dedication to serving lower income families and those in need. His strong impact in the industry not only affects the San Diego community but extends beyond the County. He was the former executive director of Tijuana-San Diego Habitat For Humanity, where he headed a team of six staff and countless volunteers that built 100 houses in Tijuana. Sauder’s achievements point the way toward a broader view of the region.

Three Weeks Downtown

Three Weeks Downtown

Letter arrives in the mail: “SUMMONS FOR JURY DUTY”.

That heart-sinking feeling… and work is way too busy.  Can I postpone?  Yes, but you need to re-schedule for a Monday. Postponement date arrives.  Turns out Mondays are when they assign the long trials.  I’m in the jury box.  Oh, you work at UC San Diego – they pay for your jury duty, right?  We’d love to have you for the next three weeks.

Your (county/state) jury duty destination: the Hall of Justice (with new county courthouse behind it)

And so it went.  After nearly 20 years in San Diego I was finally on a trial.  Overall it was a good experience, especially because I could walk around downtown every day at lunch and get up to speed on all the changes happening there.  The other neat part was how easy it was to get there.  An invigorating 10-minute morning walk to either the 215 or 235 rapid bus stops on El Cajon Boulevard, a fast trip downtown (on the 235 anyway), and a drop-off just a block from the Hall of Justice.  Compare that to my commute to UC San Diego: get cut off repeatedly on my drive to Old Town Transit Center, then sit on a bus stuck behind solo drivers on I-5.

The county’s new $555 million courthouse, the most expensive in state history, is nearly complete behind the Hall of Justice.  Here’s a shot of how the perforated roof creates light lines on the exposed interior wall of the structure:

The 22-story, 389 foot courthouse replaces the old courthouse just east of the Hall of Justice on Broadway.  I’ve heard the old central courthouse described as a ‘skyscraper on its side’.  Considering how little demand there was for land in 1960’s downtown San Diego, why build an expensive tower when you can just sprawl across three blocks:

Move-in for the new courthouse was supposed to be this month, and the new jury lounge there would have been an improvement over the one in the Hall of Justice – which along with much of the ground floor, feels much older than the building’s 1996 opening date. 

My lunchtime walks often took me past the ongoing demolition at the Naval Broadway Complex, which will be replaced by the Manchester Pacific Gateway project:

The $1.3 billion project, spread across 12 acres, will include a 17-story office building to serve as the U.S. Navy headquarters, four office buildings, two hotels, a museum, retail promenade and 1.9-acre park.

Pacific Gateway opens in 2020.  A friend who works at the Navy facility said they had to helicopter the bulldozers in because a wrecking ball wouldn’t work on the very thick walls of the buildings.  I’m guessing asbestos plays a role too:

Across Pacific Highway, Bosa’s Pacific Gate is nearing completion:

It was good to see two cruise ships docked on the harbor, given the cruise ship downturn here when travel to Mexico plummeted a decade ago:

Savina is going in behind Bayside.  Its street-level podium appears to take up the entire block, which would make it larger than Bayside’s:

The new Intercontinental Hotel continues to build up at Harbor and Broadway:

Unfortunately there’s a huge pedestrian detour on Pacific Highway for folks walking out of the SpringHill Suites/Residence Inn combo hotel, requiring them to do a loop around the Intercontinental construction.  Pacific Highway is nearly 90 feet wide here, but there isn’t enough room for a temporary pedestrian walkway? 

I stopped into Horton Plaza Park several times and witnessed the homeless problem there that was recently covered in the U-T.  While it was disappointing to see the sheer number of struggling people, I wasn’t personally impacted by it, and the Park still has potential to be a fine civic gathering area.  At least people are talking about what a space like this should be, and how it could be improved.  The same can’t be said for the south side of Horton Plaza, which couldn’t present a more pedestrian-unfriendly face to the street if it tried:  

There have been suggestions of incorporating office space into Horton Plaza, which would bring a built-in customer base to the Jimbo’s Grocery and other retail there.  Whatever changes Westfield has planned for Horton, they can’t come soon enough.

The long lunch breaks even offered the opportunity to get over to East Village, where the library’s reading room offered an excellent view of the 19-story Alexan 23-story K1 construction (the Alexan is just north) on 14th 13th:

Bike to Work Day turned into Bike to Jury Duty day this year, but I was able to hit some new pit stops (for me) as a result, including this one at Laurel and 6th:

On the Park side of Balboa Park, the zoo had also set up a pit stop, and this giant Australian Kingfisher made quite a ruckus (at 3:30 in the video):

And while I didn’t get to Quartyard during my jury duty, I did bike by there yesterday, where they were counting down their last days before moving to their new location a few blocks east at 13th and Market.  Tickets for the June 2nd closing party are available. 

Speaking of Quartyard, there’s an interesting article up about the UCSanDiego.Urban mixed-use project that will replace it, which will feature “music and food festivals”.