Planning Groups Block City’s Vision Zero, Climate Action Plans

Planning Groups Block City’s Vision Zero, Climate Action Plans

Several local community planning groups (CPGs) are obstructing the basic safety improvements required for San Diego’s Vision Zero and Climate Action Plans.  These plans are official city policies endorsed by many CPGs.  However, several bike and pedestrian safety projects have been delayed, watered down or killed by these groups recently.  This is because the established residents who often make up our CPGs prioritize street parking and fast, dangerous roads over their neighbors’ safety.

I contributed to the Monroe Bikeway piece published on BikeSD and reproduced below.  It details how the Kensington-Talmadge Planning Group has lost all credibility on bike infrastructure after opposing the City’s El Cajon Bikeway in favor of three years of delays and eventual opposition to SANDAG’s Monroe Bikeway.  The Peninsula Planning Group, fresh off declaring its opposition to affordable housing at the Famosa site (what housing crisis?), opposed two versions of a bike lane for West Point Loma Boulevard: a road diet and a reduced parking alternative.  And let’s not forget Uptown Planners declaration that absolutely no parking could be sacrificed for any SANDAG Uptown Bikeways, a position which helped kill most of the University Ave Bikeway

It’s clear that a large segment of our city’s car culture will never accept any version of a pedestrian or bike safety project, despite the recent explosion in bike and scooter riders. Much like our housing crisis, why are we allowing residents who helped create the problem an opportunity to veto any and every solution?  San Diego will never implement its Vision Zero or Climate Action Plans so long as self-interested residents continue to dictate our land use policies.    


SANDAG Monroe Bikeway Held Hostage by Kensington Talmadge Planning Group, Residents

Last week the Kensinton Talamadge Planning Group (Ken-Tal) received an update on the Monroe Bikeway segment of the North Park-Mid City Bikeways from SANDAG (San Diego Association of Governments) staff member Danny Veeh. The Monroe Bikeway is one of the last planned segments of the still-unconstructed North Park Mid City bikeways, and is a 1.3 mile bicycle boulevard connecting from Copley Price YMCA to Collwood Blvd in the College Area:  

Monroe Bikeway San Diego

Before summarizing the events of the meeting (hint: it didn’t go well), let’s go over the history of bike lane projects in the Talmadge area:

andrew bowen

So after multiple years of Monroe Bikeway planning, traffic studies, traffic modeling, presentations to planning groups/planning group subcommittees/maintenance assessment districts/community councils, modifications to those presentations, more modifications to those presentations, and votes against other bikeways because of Monroe Bikeway—what did Ken-Tal planning group do? They prepared to vote against the Monroe Bikeway.

Monroe Bikeway San Diego

The overriding issue that long predates this project is auto congestion on Monroe during rush hour. While Ken-Tal and the City have implemented many attempts to address this issue, the entire community has never been satisfied. The city tried stop signs in 2013, left turn restrictions from 47th to Monroe in 2015, and Ken-Tal floated closing 47th at Monroe and a traffic island that restricted turns. Ken-Tal has also voted to widen El Cajon Boulevard at Fairmont, directly contradicting the city’s safety efforts on this deadly street for pedestrians. These actions have exposed a bitter community divide over a basic equity issue: Should auto access to one of the most heavily-used two-lane roads in the city be limited to wealthier north Talmadge residents, or do lower income residents in south Talmadge and City Heights have a right to this public road too? The City of San Diego answered this question by instructing SANDAG to design the bikeway without altering access to Monroe from 47th.

Despite Ken-Tal chair Don Taylor’s reminders that congestion issues are well beyond the scope and budget of the bikeway, Talmadge residents and board members continue to hold the Monroe Bikeway project hostage over this neighborhood dispute. In 2017, SANDAG staff was prepared to move the project forward for environmental clearance but delayed the project for 1 year to appease Ken-Tal’s concerns. As Ken-Tal requested, a HAWK beacon was replaced with a bicycle only left turn pocket in the most recent design. Despite this concession, many board members still refused to support the project. Remarkably, former Ken-Tal chair David Moty removed his support as a result of this concession.  

When community members oppose a project for reasons that directly contradict each other, how is SANDAG ever expected to achieve the elusive “consensus” required for bike lane projects that is not required for freeway widenings and road expansions? This is the main reason why nearly every SANDAG bike lane project is behind schedule: attempting to appease armchair engineer residents who write 62-page manifestos demanding the city subsidize his lack of off-street parking, or Ken-Tal board members who attack the Monroe Bikeway for failing to improve safety—while offering no viable alternative. A Talmadge attorney even insisted the California Environmental Quality Act prohibits the bike lane—despite the governor signing two laws that prevent this environmental policy from being perverted to kill bike lanes.

Meanwhile, here’s fomer Ken-Tal chair Moty in 2015, offering full support for the Monroe Bikeway: “SANDAG staff are faced with challenges enough elsewhere, we should not create challenges for them here where overall community support is strong. The KTPG does not believe this is the city’s intent, and hopes the city will give its full support to SANDAG’s plan and remove any roadblocks to its implementation.”  

As Ken-Tal prepared to vote “no” on the Bikeway (with chair Taylor, Transportation Subcommittee chair Sean Harrison and Deborah Sharpe the only apparent “yes” votes), District 9 City Councilmember Georgette Gomez asked the board to postpone their vote. Gomez was present for the full 2 hours of contentious debate about the Bikeway and does not support 24-hour left turn restrictions onto Aldine from Monroe. She promised to take the feedback from the community planned to work with SANDAG and City of San Diego staff. Councilmember Gomez has been vocal supporter of active transportation in her role on SANDAG’s Transportation Committee and BikeSD is hopeful her leadership will result in a high-quality Monroe Bikeway.

Yet so far Ken-Tal’s efforts to delay the Monroe Bikeway have been successful. As we’ve seen with the Uptown Bikeway and in communities across the country, this is a proven model to continually delay and water down bike lanes, until eventually killing them. If San Diego is going to implement any of SANDAG’s bicycle projects, city leaders must not give into “advisory” planning groups, who actually hold a powerful veto over bike infrastructure. Further, Ken-Tal’s long history of placing its own interests over the larger Mid-City community (attempting to move planned retail away from El Cajon Boulevard; voting to worsen pedestrian safety on ECB) is another reason why our planning groups should be consolidated—at a minimum.

For supporters of the bikeway, the next big timeline will be a CEQA exemption hearing. Prior to the recent Ken-Tal planning meeting, SANDAG planned for a September hearing. Any delay will add to concerning pattern of City of San Diego and SANDAG tolerating delays to SANDAG’s early action bicycle plan.  

2 thoughts on “Planning Groups Block City’s Vision Zero, Climate Action Plans

  1. Paul, I just moved to SD at the end of May (from San Francisco). It’s been an interesting adjustment. Seeing the pretty bad condition of the streets and bikeways here in San Diego has given me new appreciation of what SF has managed to achieve — in the teeth of equally fierce car-first opposition there. Just wanted to say that I liked your blog and I’m 100% in agreement with what you’re saying here. If you have any interest in being my pal and/or working on stuff to push things forward on bikeways/active transport around SD (especially Uptown), I’d love to connect with you.

    Best,
    Patrick Santana

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *