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Bayshore Bikeway Ribbon Cutting

Bayshore Bikeway Ribbon Cutting

Bicyclists, SANDAG and local government representatives celebrated the opening of another Bayshore Bikeway segment in National City yesterday.  I was surprised to learn that planning of this Bikeway began over 40 years ago.   32nd Street Naval Station Commander Roy Love noted that over 5,000 service members living across Harbor Dr. were driving the half mile to get to the base, but that under his command he has promoted transit alternatives that reduce congestion.  Safe bike infrastructure like the Bikeway is a critical part of that effort. 

Also on hand was a LimeBike representative and a whole lot of LimeBikes, including the very cool e-bikes shown below:   

We tried out an e-bike and were surprised to feel the power assist kick in on the first pedal push.  Electric, dockless bikeshare could be a game-changer in San Diego, as LimeBike and Ofo deployed their systems here last Thursday. The LimeBike rep noted the high usage of dockless bikes around transit stations, solving the last-mile problem.  And the e-bikes remove the “San Diego is too hilly for bikes” excuse often used by the parking lobby.

Unsurprisingly, there’s already been pushback from motorists and businesses who claim our public street space is exclusively for private car storage.  Already complaining on day 2 of the bike rollout: the Hillcrest Business Association, which recently spent another $20K to kill more bike lanes, and home to HBA board member/Grah Safe & Lock owner Glenn Younger, who recently called bike lanes “Spandex Welfare”:

HBA wants to restrict where dockless bikes can be parked in the neighborhood – essentially making them docked – despite previously opposing docked bike share on public streets.  Here’s a solution: follow San Diego’s legally-binding Climate Action Plan and convert 18% of auto parking to bike parking on every block.  And far more bikes can be stored in a parking space than one car.  

After the Bayshore Bikeway event, we rode the Bikeway (which features some really unique sights and nature experiences) down to the new Imperial Beach Bikeway Village, where we were presented with this amazing panoramic view of the bay:

At the Bikeway Village, Trident Coffee (shown below) had a wide variety of cold brew coffees and other beverages.  2 Wheels Cycling Boutique has a variety of bikes, gear and a full-service repair shop.  Coronado Brewing is set to open in the Village later this year with a restaurant and brewing operation. 

It was a great feeling to visit businesses that actually valued bicyclists as their customers.  Compare this to “tolerant, inclusive, and accepting of diversity” Hillcrest, where bicyclists are called “spandex welfare” recipients, and residents and businesses actively campaign against their safety!  I know where I’ll continue to (not) spend my money.  

From the Bikeway Village we biked up the Silver Strand into Coronado and ferried back to downtown:

The Bayshore Bikeway event comes against a backdrop of SANDAG “Early Action” bike projects that have recently been delayed, delayed yet again, and then delayed after that delay – after years of delays.  I was told by a SANDAG project manager in 2014 that the 4th and 5th Ave Bikeways were ready to start construction in 2015 (except for the then-planned Balboa Park Centennial Celebration); they’re now delayed to 2019 at least. 

Every transportation project has snags, but SANDAG hit a mere *1 out of 9* bikeway milestones in FY17 and 3 out of 17 so far – those are San Diego Padre-type batting averages:

I’m a big supporter of SANDAG staff that have worked tirelessly while being targeted for abuse by business associations, community planning groups and the Uptown Parking District.  It’s tough to make progress when your (former) executive director is hostile toward bike infrastructure, absurd public comments must be considered, and local electeds would often rather avoid conflict than assert leadership. 

One bright note: the Howard/Orange Ave Bikeway passed its CEQA exemption Friday (give your feedback on aesthetic elements here).  This bikeway was cited as a reason for the City of San Diego to not provide safe bike infrastructure on El Cajon Boulevard, yet its construction has also been pushed back to 2019.

The above is another example of the City failing to live up to its Vision Zero promises on pedestrian and bicyclist safety as deaths continue to mount.  As the City Council takes notice, the Mayor’s office seems opposed to spending any money on the problem or changing staff culture.  For example, the City’s Transportation and Engineering street designs encourage high speed driving, yet Deputy Director Linda Marabian declared motorists “will not be inconvenienced” for pedestrian/bicyclist safety.  If a city deputy director is fired over a homeless person being placed in a garbage truck, why is Marabian still employed as dozens of residents continue to be killed every year?

Despite daily news of reckless, often drunk drivers killing and maiming residents (a recent example is a red-light running SUV driver that seriously injured a bicyclist in City Heights), motorists take to Nextdoor to declare bicyclists as the bigger problem:

 

It’s encouraging to see Vision Zero working in other cities that have made serious efforts to fix the problem.  Unfortunately we still have a long way to go in San Diego – on multiple levels.

firetrucks vs. flowers

firetrucks vs. flowers

nc times has an overview of wednesday’s town council meeting up in leucadia on whether to incorporate roundabouts on coast hwy 101 as part of a traffic calming and beautification project on the iconic road.  today the UT published an essay from a firefighter living in encinitas which asks the council to not install the roundabouts, saying it will further decrease emergency response times due to a decreased number of lanes.  while he makes a valid point, it brings up the question of whether all transportation design issues should be secondary to emergency services.

according to suburban nation, street widths in many new communities are dictated by the needs of the local fire department to turn around their trucks without having to shift into reverse.  as a result, these streets have become unnecessarily wide, which encourages higher speeds and the suburban domination of vehicles, at the expense of cyclist and pedestrian safety.

my favorite part of the essay is the author’s recommendation to move the pedestrians and cyclists off hwy 101 altogether, onto a trail running alongside the train tracks.  this same issue is currently being detailed on LA streetsblog, where there’s a battle over segregating LA cyclists to crime-laden bike paths with no addresses to reference when calling for help.  a bike path along the train tracks would be nice, but not at the price of being excluded from hwy 101.

there’s a similar battle going on in clairemont, where a stretch of clairemont drive was restriped to allow for a bike lane, at the expense of a vehicle lane.  this is causing longer commute times during rush hour, and many residents demanded the immediate restoration of the lane.  to be fair, many others also supported the change and noted the increased safety of the road, but lots of motorists are going to fight anything that inconveniences them.   their (apparently enraged) opposition is a case of putting their own interests over their fellow citizens’ safety, quality of life, and health.

speaking of cycling, over the holidays i rode the bayshore bikeway bridge that opened back in april, and it’s a great addition to this long route around san diego bay.  no more riding through the streets of imperial beach on this segment, and it provides some great views of the city across the bay.